Fan Feature

Post-Production Workflow – In The Field (Part 2)

POST PRODUCTION WORKFLOW

PART II: CULLING + EDITING 
By Patrick Patton

IMPORTING IMAGES
When I import files into Capture One Pro, I leave the default settings on and I import
my files into the “CAPTURE” folder, whether I am utilizing the tethered capture feature
of Capture One Pro, or just importing from a card. This keeps my method consistent,
and when it comes to file management, consistency is your best friend. When you
develop a consistent method for file management, you will have a much easier time
locating older files years down the road.

CULLING IMAGES
Culling simply means to make selections from a large quantity.
I use the rating system
to cull my images. My first pass is very liberal, and I mark anything that is usable with
one star. My second pass is decidedly more selective, and I mark only the really
fantastic images with two stars. If I still haven’t narrowed it down enough, I will go
ahead and make a third pass by marking the best of the best with three stars. I can
continue this process all the way on up to five stars if necessary, and at some point, I
should be feeling good about my selections.

ADJUSTING EXPOSURE
I usually start with exposure. Sometimes it is helpful to temporarily change your
image to black and white for this step. Adjust your exposure, brightness, contrast,
highlight recovery, shadow fill, etc. and then in most cases, you will want to copy your
adjustments to the other images to keep everything consistent, and then make any
needed adjustments from there.


PLAYING WITH COLOR

It’s a lot of fun to play with color, but you can go overboard really quickly and make
your model look like an alien from across the galaxy… in most cases, this is not ideal. I
don’t usually make my color adjustments until I’m finished retouching the image in
Photoshop (we will talk about that in Part III), but I wanted to show you that Capture
One Pro gives you some really powerful tools to play around with, and I do utilize these
from time to time.

EXPORTING IMAGES
I usually export my files to the “OUTPUT” folder. I know that this is where my select
images are going once they are ready to be opened in Photoshop for retouching. Again,
you will probably find your own method that works, and that is fine as long as you
have a consistent method that you understand.

Patrick Patton

I am a California-based photographer of people.  I work out of California’s Central Coast, home to some of the most incredible beaches in the world.  I have always enjoyed the pursuit and the challenge of creating and capturing beauty, whether it be through music, drawings, storytelling, or my favorite medium of all: photography. 

Kim Fisher (Fan Feature)

kim-f
Kim Fisher

1. Tell us a little bit about yourself?
Hello, my name is Kim!

I started my photography journey almost 2 years to the date! 24th of September 2016 was the first time I picked up a DSLR camera and attended my first workshop which included ‘how to turn your camera on’! Prior to that I had just been using my iphone to take pictures of my family or various events I attended, but nothing with intention behind it. My journey with photography wasn’t a life long passion but more ‘love at first sight’.

Before I discovered photography I had worked as a jewellery buyer, fashion merchandise planner, as well as a business consultant.
At the moment I only work 3 days a week, the rest of the time I’m a stay at home mother to two young boys (4 years old and 2 years old). I’m 35 years old if you were wondering, I probably should have started with that!
I’m originally from South Africa but now live in Adelaide, South Australia, not exactly a thriving fashion capital, but the aim is to one day be flying out to locations for fashion shoots.

2. What are you working on right now?
My regular client work which involves content creation for bloggers/influencers, a couple of model test shoots and a potential collaboration with a up and coming local singer. As well as trying to organize a few additional shoots to boost my portfolio and hopefully result in me booking fashion campaigns and editorial work.

3. Do you have a podcast routine? What is it?
My podcast routine is usually to listen while I edit, at the moment that is mostly every evening Monday – Friday. I currently have 3 podcasts on rotation, The Fashion Photography Podcast (obviously 😉), BOF (the Business of Fashion) podcast, and Gary Vee (a no nonsense, tell it as it is business and motivational podcast).

4. What are you most excited about right now?
I’ll be attending the Adelaide Fashion Festival, it is my first time attending any fashion festival so I’m excited to find out what it’s all about.

5. What was the most exciting photo shoot you’ve done so far?

Probably one of the very first fashion shoots that I organized to build my portfolio.

 I came up with a spring romance concept and organized the model, HMUA, location, did the styling, everything. Just by chance I submitted some of the images to Fashion Shift Magazine and it was accepted for publication.

6. What’s your dream photo shoot? 
Isn’t it every fashion photographer’s dream to shoot the cover of Vogue!

7. Where do you see yourself in 3 years? 
I’d like to be doing more fashion campaigns and commissioned magazine editorials/covers, but not just as the photographer I’d also like to be involved in the concept creation/direction. And to have a sustainable income from doing this.

8. Do you have a favorite source of knowledge (website/YouTube channel/blog/app) you’d like to share with us?
Blog – PetaPixel for photography news
YouTube – PiXimperfect, PHLEARN, Anita Sadowska, Tony and Chelsea Northrup

9. What’s your biggest struggle right now? 
Probably patience. Accepting that it takes time to reach those big dreams that I have, to make a name for myself and get known within the fashion industry.

Tim Copsey (Fan Feature)

Tim Copsey

1. Tell us a little bit about yourself?
Hello, my name is Tim Copsey I am a British photographer who works in the genres of fashion, portraiture and performing arts. I am based just outside London where I frequently shoot. Given the choice I love to shoot monochrome but I am gradually warming to colour as well.

2. What are you working on right now?
I am preparing to shoot a fashion show in the Australian embassy and some editorial shoots around London for some designers that have flown in from the Pacific.

3. Do you have a podcast routine? What is it?
I am not organized enough for that! I listen to podcasts when I remember to. Nearly always when I am doing something else, so instead of listening to the radio I will put the fashion photography podcast on.

4. What are you most excited about right now?

The next time I am shooting. Every time I shoot I feel fully alive.

5. What was the most exciting photo shoot you’ve done so far? 
It is difficult to single out one shoot, but I think I would have to say at the moment, a mini shoot I had in Milan. It followed directly on from a fashion show I had shot. It involved some models that had just walked the runway and took place in the hotel where the show was. It was a short period of time but the models, clothes and setting was just right and I felt in my zone. Wonderful.

6. What’s your dream photo shoot? 
Front cover of British Vogue

7. Where do you see yourself in 3 years? 
Further along in my photography career, with more clients and prestigious publications. Hopefully I will have made even more friends and tried to help more fellow creatives along their journey too.

8. Do you have a favorite source of knowledge (website/YouTube channel/blog/app) you’d like to share with us? 
My favorite source of inspiration and pearls of wisdom from the real world of fashion photography is The Fashion Photography Podcast and I am not just saying that. Other than that I find the most useful thing other than shooting constantly that helps develop my eye is to read top publications such as Vogue. I also like to look at the work of master photographers and most frequently these are the all time greats as I am always excited to see photographs that have the “timeless” quality .

9. What’s your biggest struggle right now? 
In all honesty I need to develop my ability to connect with and attract more commercial clients. In this current age where “everybody is a photographer” it is important to improve commercial knowledge to attract sustainable work. There is a climate of clients wanting creatives to work for free and this is a challenge.

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